WELCOME TO SAINT JOHN’S CHURCH

Welcome to St. John's Church, Lafayette Square—a vibrant historic Episcopal church located across from the White House. We invite you to join with us for worship, Christian fellowship and outreach.

History

From our organization as a parish in 1815 to today, St. John's Church has provided a powerful symbol of faith in the heart of our nation's capital.

Mission

At St. John's, we believe Christ is calling us to be a renewed church in a changing world. In worship, education, parish life, and social action, we seek to expand our horizons by serving God by loving one another.

Clergy & Staff

Meet St. John’s diverse and engaging clergy, vestry and staff.

Service Times

St. John's offers several opportunities on Sundays and during the workweek for you to join us during worship. All are welcome.

Directions & Parking

Located at the corner of 16th and H Streets in Northwest Washington, St. John's is near the McPherson Square and Farragut North Metro stations. Limited street parking is available; free valet parking is offered for certain hours.

Rector Transition

On October 17, 2017, the Rev. Dr. Luis León, rector of St. John's Church, announced his retirement in May 2018.
Pathways Through Lent

Thursday After Ash Wednesday

What do people say about me? What are people thinking? We are mindful of the opinions of others, about us and about nearly everything. Opinions elate and devastate. They influence what we do and how we understand ourselves, whether it is polls, likes, ratings, or that old standby, gossip. It seems easier to focus on what others have to say than our own experience.

Jesus has just fed the crowds, and his disciples approach him as he prays alone. It is easy to imagine Jesus asking these questions with an eye to some positive reviews, and his disciples are quick to provide the buzz from the crowd. Imagine how it must have influenced how they see Jesus.

But who do you say I am? Jesus then asks his disciples this question based on what they believe. There is an almost palpable silence. Time and again, Jesus has revealed himself to the disciples, and Jesus is looking for recognition.  Divinely, dangerously, it is Peter who declares him the Messiah from God.

Luke’s passage reminds us to consider what we believe, not what the crowd has to say. As we enter Lent, the question Jesus asks his disciples is in front of each of us. He is asking us to answer from our hearts, with the help of God. But who do you say I am?

Julia Koster

Appointed readings for today: Deuteronomy 30:15-20, Psalm 1, Luke 9:18-25


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