WELCOME TO SAINT JOHN’S CHURCH

Welcome to St. John's Church, Lafayette Square—a vibrant historic Episcopal church located across from the White House. We invite you to join with us for worship, Christian fellowship and outreach.

History

From our organization as a parish in 1815 to today, St. John's Church has provided a powerful symbol of faith in the heart of our nation's capital.

Mission

At St. John's, we believe Christ is calling us to be a renewed church in a changing world. In worship, education, parish life, and social action, we seek to expand our horizons by serving God by loving one another.

Clergy & Staff

Meet St. John’s diverse and engaging clergy, vestry and staff.

Service Times

St. John's offers several opportunities on Sundays and during the workweek for you to join us during worship. All are welcome.

Directions & Parking

Located at the corner of 16th and H Streets in Northwest Washington, St. John's is near the McPherson Square and Farragut North Metro stations. Limited street parking is available; free valet parking is offered for certain hours.

Rector Transition

On October 17, 2017, the Rev. Dr. Luis León, rector of St. John's Church, announced his retirement in May 2018.
Pathways Through Lent

Thursday in the First Week of Lent

Today’s reading from Matthew brings some words that at first glance seem like a pretty good guarantee: “seek and ye shall find.” If you put in a bit of effort to seek, you will be rewarded. Yet even with this guarantee, we can be reluctant. What are the obstacles in our way?

Is it that we are worried that we won’t like what we find? Regardless of what we are expecting to find, seeking increases awareness of self, others, and the world. In seeking we are made more aware of the dream of God for this world, which in turn makes us more aware of the world’s brokenness. It can be all too easy these days to see what is wrong in the world and feel overwhelmed. How can you fix poverty? How can you fix injustice? How can you fix violence?

This can be particularly difficult for those of us who see ourselves as problem solvers. When we become aware of a problem in the world, finding becomes a burden as we think that we have to solve the problem all on our own. It takes a concerted effort to step back and say, no, it is possible to be a solution to a piece of the problem. Seeking does not mean that we have to bring to life God’s dream for this world all on our own.

Katherine McClintic

Appointed readings for today: Esther (Apocrypha) 14:1-6, 12-14, Psalm 138, Matthew 7:7-12


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