WELCOME TO SAINT JOHN’S CHURCH

Welcome to St. John's Church, Lafayette Square—a vibrant historic Episcopal church located across from the White House. We invite you to join with us for worship, Christian fellowship and outreach.

History

From our organization as a parish in 1815 to today, St. John's Church has provided a powerful symbol of faith in the heart of our nation's capital.

Mission

At St. John's, we believe Christ is calling us to be a renewed church in a changing world. In worship, education, parish life, and social action, we seek to expand our horizons by serving God by loving one another.

Clergy & Staff

Meet St. John’s diverse and engaging clergy, vestry and staff.

Service Times

St. John's offers several opportunities on Sundays and during the workweek for you to join us during worship. All are welcome.

Directions & Parking

Located at the corner of 16th and H Streets in Northwest Washington, St. John's is near the McPherson Square and Farragut North Metro stations. Limited street parking is available; free valet parking is offered for certain hours.
Pathways Through Lent

Tuesday in the Third Week of Lent

Yet a time is coming and has now come when the true worshipers will worship the Father in the Spirit and in truth, for they are the kind of worshipers the Father seeks. God is Spirit, and his worshipers must worship in the Spirit and in truth. (John 4:23-24)

 

The Israelites were losing faith in the desert. They asked if the Lord was among them or not. They were thirsty and tired. Moses was clearly frustrated, but God was with him and told him what to do.

 

Being thirsty and tired is a real thing for humans. And, Jesus was human. When he was at the well in Samaria, he was tired and thirsty. There he asked the Samaritan woman for water. Jesus tells her that he is the Messiah. Jesus then stays with the Samaritans for two days, defying cultural taboos. In those two days, “because of his words many more became believers.” (John 4:41)

 

We don’t really know what Jesus said or did in that time. He doesn’t seem to tell them to do anything, but his Spirit was present. When I try to bring this story to present day, I know that God’s Spirit is still seeking us. We are the kind of worshipers God is seeking: “God is Spirit, and God’s worshipers must worship in the Spirit.” I love this, and it speaks to me and my understanding of God. The Spirit of God is eternal life. We are the reapers of the fields that are ripe for harvest. Our job is to reap; another has already sown.

 

Jesus says he, “sent you to reap what you have not worked for. Others have done the hard work, and you have reaped the benefits of their labor.” (John 4:37-38) God calls us to reap what we have not worked for. God wants us to seek the Spirit. Where are you seeking the Spirit of God this Lent?

 

Thom Sinclair

Appointed readings for today: Exodus 17:1-7, Psalm 95:6-11, John 4:5-42


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